Speaker: Mark Crego

The Difficulties and Joys of “Inner Work”

In this session, leaders of the Faith Journey Foundation, the non-profit organization that manages and facilitates Latter-day Faith and several other podcasts, will share their reflections on their attempts to walk the challenging but rewarding path of spiritual development (“inner work”) that involves entirely changing how we approach life, hold our beliefs, interact with others, …

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Reflections on Thoughtful Faith in Community: Staying Meaningfully Engaged in the Struggle

This panel from A Thoughtful Faith Facebook Support Group will explore how struggle builds faith and community. The participants’ collective experience is that both online and in-person communities can help reconstruct thoughtful faith and forge bonds of loving support as we deal with challenges to cherished beliefs. Mark Crego, Jeralee Renshaw, Richard Ostler, Susan Meredith …

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Mormon Identity in Crisis: Embracing the Least of These

Our Mormon Identity is often conferred upon us by parents and a high-demand religious culture, leaving little room for exploration and mature identity development. As a result, the Mormon identity is often child-like in its magical worldview, and vulnerable to delayed identity crises in adulthood when challenges to beliefs arise. Additionally, Mormon institutions often foster …

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The Middle Way That Goes Beyond Middle Ground

Thoughtful and faithful middle ways are found in many of the great religious traditions. After exploring the middle ways of Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, and Episcopalianism, this presentation will explore a uniquely LDS middle way identity that is distinctly not “middle ground.” Mark Crego

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The Middle Way That Goes Beyond Middle Ground

Thoughtful and faithful middle ways are found in many of the great religious traditions. After exploring the middle ways of Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, and Episcopalianism, this presentation will explore a uniquely LDS middle way identity that is distinctly not “middle ground.” Mark Crego

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