Event: San Francisco Symposium 2005

JOSEPH SMITH, WILLIAM MILLER, ELLEN G. WHITE, AND MARY BAKER EDDY: FOUR AMERICAN PROPHETS’ PERSPECTIVES ON SLAVERY, RACE, AND ETHNICITY

This presentation compares and contrasts Joseph Smith’s views and practices regarding slavery, race, and ethnicity with those of William Miller and Ellen G. White (founding leaders of Seventh Day Adventism) and Mary Baker Eddy (founder of the Christian Science movement). These issues figured prominently in all three religious movements, but while all four leaders were …

Read more

THE FIRST TWO OF FIVE BRIEF ESSAYS ON THE ATONEMENT

In these two essays, I work to lay out the rationale and groundwork for any serious LDS consideration of the atonement of Christ. The first essay explores the context of the project. Why should we engage in such speculation as this? What is the LDS view of the role of reason in religious and spiritual …

Read more

PANEL. MORMON FEMINIST LITERATURE REVIEW

Join panelists for a lively discussion of our favorite, provocative, thought-provoking, revolutionary, inspirational, and faith-enhancing books in the field of feminist spirituality. Re-discover the classics, and hear about newer volumes too good to keep to ourselves! A list of our top picks will be available for the audience. Mary Ellen Robertson, Carol Lynn Pearson Lavina …

Read more

CREATIONISM, POSTMODERNISM, AND MORMONISM

SF05013, LDS writers addressing the challenges of modern science, ranging from evolution and cosmology to Book of Mormon historicity, have frequently resorted to arguments derived from either the creationist or the postmodern science studies communities. The literature of these two groups, while poles apart on most intellectual and social issues, exhibits characteristics of poor scholarship, …

Read more

DISCUSSION. LDS PERSPECTIVES ON THE STEM CELL DEBATE

The debate revolving around embryonic stem cell research often degenerates into a partisan-style argument over when life begins, or, from a Mormon perspective, when the spirit enters the body. The ethics of stem cell research deserves better, and Latter-day Saint theology and practice provide a framework for a more constructive debate. David Hunter

Read more